Reconciliation Day: Taking The Country Forward

Ruth Koko is one of Mission South Africa's Cultural Affairs Assistants.
On #ReconciliationDay, we asked Ruth Koko, one of our Cultural Affairs Assistants, to share what Reconciliation Day means to her & why it’s important for both our nations to continue to strive towards unity in our diversity 👇👇
 
“What used to be known as Dingaan’s Day or Day of Vow because of the battle between the Voortrekkers and Zulu warriors, is today the Day of Reconciliation. Though this important day comes at a time when many compatriots are in a festive mood and not paying attention to its significance, for me it’s very meaningful as it tells a story of how far we have come as a country. This day is important for everyone and future generations to understand the importance of a united nation and country, and that it is through unity that we can prosper.
 
“The Ubuntu in South Africans should always be a reminder of who we are, and the basis of our values. Working for the U.S. government post-democracy has allowed me to learn more about a country that is a melting pot. The United States amid its challenges has been a melting pot for many decades and this is something that South Africa is or has become. I am proud of the lessons I have learned through my work with important dates such as Black History Month. The exchange sessions we host between Americans and fellow South Africans are platforms for sharing ideas and our common values about reconciliation, living together with our diversity, provide good insights on how to take our country forward. So, Reconciliation Day for me is about humanity, respect for fellow compatriots, and peace. HAPPY RECONCILIATION DAY!”